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 Prof Chee Hing Tan

Prof John David

Dr Jo Shien Ng

Dr Jon Willmott


NEWS



Defence Growth Partnership Innovation Challenge Winners Announced

05-Oct-15

A project led by Dr. Jon Willmott and Prof. Chee Hing Tan has been selected as one of more than 20 projects funded.�

"PROMIS Workshop

05-Oct-15

Prof. Chee Hing Tan and Dr. Jo Shien Ng have successfully run a three day workshop for a Marie Curie ITN project called Postgraduate Research on Dilute Metamorphic Nanostructures and Metamaterials in Semiconductor Photonics (PROMIS).

Editorial

Sensing of electromagnetic waves has revolutionised society through diverse areas such as communications, manufacturing, health and imaging. Below are some of our latest contributions to the field.




Ultraviolet Imaging with Low Cost Smartphone Sensors: Development and Application of a Raspberry Pi-Based UV Camera
2016


Wilkes, TC and McGonigle, AJS and Pering, TD and Taggart, AJ and White, BS and Bryant, RG and Willmott, JR

Here, we report, for what we believe to be the first time, on the modification of a low cost sensor, designed for the smartphone camera market, to develop an ultraviolet (UV) camera system. This was achieved via adaptation of Raspberry Pi cameras, which are based on back-illuminated complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) sensors, and we demonstrated the utility of these devices for applications at wavelengths as low as 310 nm, by remotely sensing power station smokestack emissions in this spectral region. Given the very low cost of these units, ≈ USD 25, they are suitable for widespread proliferation in a variety of UV imaging applications, e.g., in atmospheric science, volcanology, forensics and surface smoothness measurements.

doi:10.3390/s16101649




 

InGaAs/AlGaAsSb avalanche photodiode with high gain-bandwidth product
2016


Xie, S and Zhou, X and Zhang, S and Thomson, DJ and Chen, X and Reed, GT and Ng, JS and Tan, CH

Abstract not available

doi:10.1364/OE.24.024242




 

Thermal territories of the abdomen after caesarean section birth: Infrared thermography and analysis http://www.magonlinelibrary.com/doi/pdf/10.12968/jowc.2016.25.9.499
2016


Childs, C and Siraj, MR and Fair, FJ and Selvan, AN and Soltani, H and Wilmott, J and Farrell, T

© 2016 MA Healthcare Ltd.Objective: To develop and refine qualitative mapping and quantitative analysis techniques to define 'thermal territories' of the post-partum abdomen, the caesarean section site and the infected surgical wound. In addition to explore women's perspectives on thermal imaging and acceptability as a method for infection screening. Method: Prospective feasibility study undertaken at a large University teaching hospital, Sheffield, UK. Infrared thermal imaging of the abdomen was undertaken at the bedside on the first two days after elective caesarean section. Target recruitment: six women in each of three body mass index (BMI) categories (normal, 18.5-24.9 kg/m2; overweight 25-29.9 kg/m2; obese ≥30 kg/m2). Additionally women presenting to the ward with wound infection were eligible for inclusion in the study. Perspectives on the use of thermal imaging and its practicality were also explored via semi-structured interviews and analysed using thematic content analysis. Results: We recruited 20 women who had all undergone caesarean section. From the booking BMI, eight women were obese (including two women with infected wounds), seven women were overweight and five women had a normal BMI. Temperature (oC) profiling and pixel clustering segmentation (hierarchical clustering-based segmentation, HCS) revealed characteristic features of thermal territories between scar and adjacent regions. Differences in scar thermal intensity profiles exist between healthy scars and infected wounds; features that have potential for wound surveillance. The maximum temperature differences (ΔT) between healthy skin and the wound site exceed 2°C in women with established wound infection. At day two, two women had a scar thermogram with features observed in the 'infected' wound thermogram. Conclusion: Thermal imaging at early and later times after caesarean birth is feasible and acceptable. Women reported potential benefits of the technique for future wound infection screening. Thermal intensity profiling and HCS for pixel cluster dissimilarity between scar and adjacent healthy skin has potential as a method for the development of techniques targeted to early infection surveillance in women after caesarean section. Declaration of interest: All the authors confirm that there is no conflict of interest in the design, conduct and presentation of the research.

doi:10.12968/jowc.2016.25.9.499




 

Potential for improved radiation thermometry measurement uncertainty through implementing a primary scale in an industrial laboratory
2016


Willmott, JR and Lowe, D and Broughton, M and White, BS and Machin, G

A primary temperature scale requires realising a unit in terms of its definition. For high temperature radiation thermometry in terms of the International Temperature Scale of 199

doi:10.1088/0957-0233/27/9/094002




 

Al0.52In0.48P avalanche photodiodes for soft X-ray spectroscopy
2016


Auckloo, A and Cheong, JS and Meng, X and Tan,, CH and Ng, JS and Krysa, AB and Tozer, RC and David, JPR

Abstract not available

doi:10.1088/1748-0221/11/03/P03021




 

Picosecond laser ranging at wavelengths up to 2.4 μm using an InAs avalanche photodiode
2016


Buller, GS and Butera, S and Sandall, I and Vines, P and Tan, CH

Abstract not available

doi:10.1049/el.2015.3995




 

InGaAs/InAlAs single photon avalanche diode for 1550 nm photons
2016


Meng, X and Xie, S and Zhou, X and Calandri, N and Sanzaro, M and Tosi, A and Tan, CH and Ng, JS

Abstract not available

doi:10.1098/rsos.150584




 

Characterization of gallium arsenide X-ray mesa p-i-n photodiodes at room temperature
2016


Lioliou, G and Meng, X and Ng, JS and Barnett, AM

Abstract not available

doi:10.1016/j.nima.2015.12.030




 

Al0.52In0.48P avalanche photodiodes for soft X-ray spectroscopy
2016


Auckloo, A and Cheong, JS and Meng, X and Tan,, CH and Ng, JS and Krysa, AB and Tozer, RC and David, JPR

Abstract not available

doi:10.1088/1748-0221/11/03/P03021




 

InGaAs/InAlAs single photon avalanche diode for 1550 nm photons
2016


Meng, X and Xie, S and Zhou, X and Calandri, N and Sanzaro, M and Tosi, A and Tan, CH and Ng, JS

Abstract not available

doi:10.1098/rsos.150584




 

Temperature dependent characterization of gallium arsenide X-ray mesa p-i-n photodiodes
2016


Lioliou, G and Meng, X and Ng, JS and Barnett, AM

Abstract not available

doi:10.1063/1.4944892




 

High Gain InAs Planar Avalanche Photodiodes
2016


White, BS and Sandall, I and Zhou, X and Krysa, AB and McEvan, K and David, J and Tan, C

Abstract not available

doi:10.1109/JLT.2016.2531278




 

Avalanche Noise in Al 0.52 In 0.48 P Diodes
2016


Qiao, L and Cheong, JS and Ong, JSL and Ng, JS and Krysa, AB and Green, JE and David, JPR

Abstract not available

doi:10.1109/LPT.2015.2499545




 

Comparison of extrapolated and interpolated temperature scales from 1000°C to 2500°C between a national measurement institute and an ISO17025 accredited calibration laboratory
2015


Lowe, D and Broughton, M and Machin, G and Willmott, JR

Abstract not available

doi:10.1016/j.measurement.2015.08.011




 

InAs Photodiodes for 3.43 \$\mu \textm\$ Radiation Thermometry
2015


Zhou, X and Meng, X and Krysa, AB and Willmott, JR and Ng, JS and Tan, CH

Abstract not available

doi:10.1109/JSEN.2015.2443563




 

InAs avalanche photodiodes as X-ray detectors
2015


Meng, X and Zhou, X and Zhang, S and Lees, J and Tan, CH and Ng, JS

Abstract not available

doi:10.1088/1748-0221/10/10/P10030




 

InAs Photodiodes for 3.43 \$\mu \textm\$ Radiation Thermometry
2015


Zhou, X and Meng, X and Krysa, AB and Willmott, JR and Ng, JS and Tan, CH

Abstract not available

doi:10.1109/JSEN.2015.2443563




 

InAs Photodiodes for 3.43 \$\mu \textm\$ Radiation Thermometry
2015


Zhou, X and Meng, X and Krysa, AB and Willmott, JR and Ng, JS and Tan, CH

Abstract not available

doi:10.1109/JSEN.2015.2443563




 

Determination of absorption coefficients in AlInP lattice matched to GaAs
2015


Cheong, JS and Ng, JS and Krysa, AB and Ong, JSL and David, JPR

Abstract not available

doi:10.1088/0022-3727/48/40/405101




 

InAs avalanche photodiodes as X-ray detectors
2015


Meng, X and Zhou, X and Zhang, S and Lees, J and Tan, CH and Ng, JS

Abstract not available

doi:10.1088/1748-0221/10/10/P10030




 

InAs Diodes Fabricated Using Be Ion Implantation
2015


White, BS and Sandall, IC and David, JPR and Chee Hing Tan

Abstract not available

doi:10.1109/TED.2015.2456434




 

InGaAs/InAlAs Avalanche Photodiode With Low Dark Current for High-Speed Operation
2015


Shiyu Xie and Shiyong Zhang and Chee Hing Tan

Abstract not available

doi:10.1109/LPT.2015.2439153




 

InGaAs/InAlAs Avalanche Photodiode With Low Dark Current for High-Speed Operation
2015


Xie, S and Zhang, S and Tan, CH

Abstract not available

doi:10.1109/LPT.2015.2439153




 

InAs/GaSb Type-II Superlattice for Radiation Thermometry
2015


Hobbs, MJ and Tan, CH and Zhou, X and David, JPR and Willmott, JR and Plis, E and Krishna, S

Abstract not available

doi:10.1109/TIM.2014.2341411




 

InAs/GaSb Type-II Superlattice for Radiation Thermometry
2015


Hobbs, MJ and Tan, CH and Zhou, X and David, JPR and Willmott, JR and Plis, E and Krishna, S

Abstract not available

doi:10.1109/TIM.2014.2341411




 

Characterization of room temperature AlGaAs soft X-ray mesa photodiodes
2015


Barnett, AM and Lioliou, G and Ng, JS

Abstract not available

doi:10.1016/j.nima.2014.11.039




 

H-tailored surface conductivity in narrow band gap In(AsN)
2015


Velichko, AV and Patanè, A and Capizzi, M and Sandall, IC and Giubertoni, D and Makarovsky, O and Polimeni, A and Krier, A and Zhuang, Q and Tan, CH

Abstract not available

doi:10.1063/1.4906111




 

Al0.52In0.48P SAM-APD as a Blue-Green Detector
2014


Krysa, A

We demonstrate an Al0.52In0.48 P homo-junction Separate Absorption Multiplication Avalanche Photodiode as a detector with narrow spectral response in the blue-green part of the optical spectrum. Due to its wide band-gap, this device has a dark current density of <; 8 nA cm-2 at 99.9\% of the breakdown voltage at room temperature. This device has a peak responsivity at 483 nm of 0.15 A/W when punched-through and is capable of an avalanche gain higher than 100.

doi:10.1109/JSTQE.2014.2316601




 

1550 nm InGaAs/InAlAs single photon avalanche diode at room temperature
2014


Meng, X and Tan, CH and Dimler, S and David, JPR and Ng, JS

Abstract not available

doi:10.1364/OE.22.022608




 

1550 nm InGaAs/InAlAs single photon avalanche diode at room temperature
2014


Meng, X and Tan, CH and Dimler, S and David, JPR and Ng, JS

Abstract not available

doi:10.1364/OE.22.022608